Nashville Hot Chicken using the Vortex

I recently made ‘fried’ chicken on my Weber Performer grill using the Vortex insert. The chicken came out fantastic, which inspired me to then try making Nashville hot chicken also using the Vortex. Wow, oh wow, was it absolutely great chicken. Lightly crunchy, and a little spicy, it was a dish to remember. This method is definitely a great substitute for the traditional way of making Nashville hot chicken in a deep fryer.

Nashville Hot Chicken using the VortexI used split bone-in chicken breasts when I made this Nashville hot chicken using the Vortex. It’s our preferred cut of chicken, but you can use any cut you like. Just keep in mind that if you mix pieces that are greatly different in size some may be done before others. Smaller pieces can be checked for doneness after the 45 minutes cooking time.

Nashville Hot Chicken using the VortexAlso check out my recipe for making ‘fried’ chicken using the Vortex. For a more southern twist, try my Buzznbeez southern fried chicken. My Cajun injected chicken, also cooked up perfectly using the Vortex, is another big hit!

Nashville Hot Chicken using the Vortex

Course Main
Cuisine American
Prep Time 1 day
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 day 1 hour
Servings 4 -8 servings
Author Mike

Ingredients

For the dry brine

  • 3 pounds chicken cut into pieces I used 4 large split bone-in breasts
  • 1 tablespoon Kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper

For the dip

  • 1 cup milk I used buttermilk Note: If you have pickle juice on hand, use 1/2 cup milk and 1/2 cup pickle juice instead
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon Louisiana-style hot sauce

For the dredge

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher salt

For the spicy coating

  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1-3 tablespoons cayenne pepper I used 2 and found the flavor to be perfect, and not too terribly hot
  • 1 tablespoon light brown sugar
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

For serving

  • Dill pickle slices
  • White bread slices

Instructions

For the dry brine

  • Season chicken and place into a baggie or resealable container.
  • Seal and refrigerate overnight or up to 24 hours.

For the dip

  • Whisk together the milk, eggs and hot sauce in a pie pan or shallow bowl.

For the dredge

  • Whisk together the flour and salt in a pie pan or shallow bowl.

For cooking

  • Fire up your grill with the Vortex insert full of charcoal.
  • Let the coals get good and ashed over.
  • Working in batches, dredge the chicken in the flour. Shake off excess.
  • Dip chicken into the milk mixture. Shake off excess.
  • Return the chicken to the flour and dredge again. Shake off excess.
  • Transfer chicken to the grill, placing it along the edges of the grill.
  • Cover and cook for 15 minutes.
  • Rotate the lid 90 degrees and cook another 15 minutes.
  • Brush the chicken with the spicy coating. Rotate the lid 90 degrees and cook another 15 minutes
  • Brush the chicken with the spicy coating. Rotate the lid 90 degrees and cook another 15 minutes
  • Check for doneness. Remove when done and let rest 10-15 minutes before serving.

For the spicy coating

  • Heat the oil in a small saute pan.
  • Whisk in the remaining ingredients.
  • Keep warm until ready to use.

For serving

  • Serve garnished with dill pickle and white bread slices, if desired.

Miss “Barbee-Q” Grill

I’m always on the lookout for vintage grills, and in particular, ones that have never been used. A lot of these grills were given as gifts and end up in attics, garages, or the backs of closets for years and years. I run across them at antique malls, eBay, or Craigslist on occasion. Like this Miss “Barbee-Q” grill.

Miss "Barbee-Q" GrillI picked up this Miss “Barbee-Q” grill for around $20. Never used, in a box that showed just a bit of wear. One thing is for sure, I’ll use it just like I use every grill I own (that is, regularly). This grill makes the perfect little patio grill. I loaded it up with a small chimney full of lit charcoal, and put on some nice all-beef dinner dogs. They came out great.Miss "Barbee-Q" GrillI can see using this Miss “Barbee-Q” grill at a park when we go out for a picnic. It’s small, light, and easy to clean. I’m not sure I’d use it in our “rec” room as the box suggests, though, but it’d work just fine in a fireplace with the chimney flue open (of course).

Also check out my vintage portable Coca Cola grill.

 

Coca Cola Portable Grill

We were down at the Persimmon Festival in Mitchell, Indiana a while back, waiting on the parade to start when my youngest nephew asked if I wanted to go “up town” and hit some of the antique stores. “Sure”, I said, and off we went. Well, wouldn’t you know that the first antique store we walked into had this little old¬†Coca Cola portable grill sitting in the back. I wasn’t going to get it, but my nephew convinced me that I should get it and that if I didn’t, I would regret it. So, I bought it.

Coca Cola Portable Grill

I fired it up a few days ago. It worked like a charm. It’s about the same cooking area as my Weber Smokey Joe, one of my favorite grills. Perfect for a picnic or lunch for 1 or 2. It’s portable, and light. A bit too light in that the metal is pretty thin, so I don’t expect it to last a lifetime. It had been used a few times, which surprised me. A lot of times people get these kinds of collectibles and never use them. If you ever see me buy a grill and not use it (which reminds me…. I haven’t used the 1960s fireplace grill I found), slap me. Gently, but still slap me.

Turns out this grill is actually part of a picnic set put out by Coca Cola (I have not found out the year yet) that also included a small cooler and grill tool set. So, I’m on a mission now to get the rest of the set. Who knows, maybe I’ll find it at the next antique mall we visit.

Also check out my vintage 1977 Li’l Smoker BBQ grill.