Fiery Smoked Chuck Roast

Chuck roast goes on sale here every so often and since I’m huge fan of smoked chuck, I always rummage through the meat case and find some that has a nice marbling and is the same thickness throughout and rush home to toss it on the smoker. I’ve smoked Cajun chuck roast, Barbacoa-style, and just ‘plain’ ole chuck roast and all were fantastic. This time I decided to go the spicy route and marinate the roast overnight in Goya’s chipotle marinade. The beef took on a wonderful flavor that wasn’t overly spicy but still had a really nice kick. Perfect on a sandwich, and much cheaper than brisket.
Smoked chuck roast looks and ‘acts’ pretty much like smoked brisket. It slices well if you prefer yours sliced. It chops well if you’re into that. And it pulls great too. I like mine pulled just like pulled pork BBQ. Mounded high on a bun I’m a very happy guy. Fiery smoked chuck roast makes me happy.

Fiery Smoked Chuck Roast
Author: 
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 10-12 servings
 
Ingredients
  • 3 pound chuck roast
  • 1/2 (24 ounce) bottle Goya Mojo Chipotle Marinade
  • Chipotle chili powder, to taste (or substitute your favorite spicy rub)
Instructions
  1. Place the chuck roast into a resealable container or bag.
  2. Add the marinade. Seal and toss to coat.
  3. Refrigerate overnight.
  4. Fire up your smoker for cooking at 250 F.
  5. Shake off any excessive marinade and sprinkle the roast with the chipotle chili powder.
  6. Smoke for two hours.
  7. Transfer meat to a large piece of foil and seal tightly.
  8. Return to the smoker and smoke another 4-5 hours or until the internal temperature reaches 200 F.
  9. Remove from the smoker and let rest 30 minutes before slicing or chopping.

Smoked Blueberry Beanie Weenie

I do love a big, big batch of smoked baked beans. And I love beans and weenies. So I was intrigued when I came across this recipe for smoked blueberry beanie weenies. My first reaction was “What? Blueberry?”. Well, you often put maple syrup in beans and on pancakes. And you put blueberry syrup on pancakes… so maybe that’s where the original idea came from? Well, whatever spurred it, I love them. They are a very pleasant change from the usual beans that you’re expecting. Don’t tell anyone that there’s blueberry syrup in these beans. Just sit back and watch the surprise on their faces as they take their first bites.
Other than the addition of blueberry syrup, these smoked blueberry beanie weenies are pretty much your standard, awesome beanie weenies. It’s the syrup that’s the surprise. Since the syrup is fairly sweet I wasn’t real shy with the hot sauce. I wanted a little kick to go with the sweet.

Even my un-smoked beans and weenies are different. Try them.

Smoked Blueberry Beanie Weenie
Author: 
Recipe type: Side
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6-8 servings
 
Ingredients
  • 1 (16 ounce) can great northern beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (16 ounce) can light red kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (16 ounce) can dark red kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 4 slices bacon, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 3/4 cup blueberry syrup
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon Kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried ginger
  • 2 teaspoons dry mustard
  • Freshly ground black pepper and hot sauce, to taste
  • Hot dogs, sliced as desired
Instructions
  1. Fire up your smoker for cooking at 225 F. Use a light wood such as apple, maple or peach.
  2. Place the beans in a large bowl.
  3. Heat a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the bacon and cook until just starting to crisp. Remove.
  4. Add the onion and saute until softened. Remove.
  5. Combine all but the hot dogs with the beans.
  6. Pour the mixture into a 8" x 13" disposable pan and place on the smoker, uncovered, for 3 hours.
  7. Stir in the hot dogs and cook another 30 minutes.
  8. Serve.

Smoked Italian Meatloaf

Smoked meatloaf ends up on our dinner rotation with some regularity. Our meatloaf usually consists of a mixture of meat, spices, vegetables and some sort of binder to make it all come together. When I saw this idea for a smoked Italian meatloaf I was all over it in a heartbeat. It’s a combination of what I consider a fairly traditional meat mixture infused with Italian flavors, but then comes the tasty cool part: it’s stuffed with prosciutto, arugula, and provolone cheese! Mama mia!
After you’ve combined the ingredients for the meat mixture, spread it out and topped it, you have a decision to make. Do you roll it up along the long axis, giving you a long loaf that produces a good number of smaller slices, or do you roll it along the short side, giving you a large loaf that produces super-big pieces and more toppings in every bite? Decisions, decisions. I went with the long loaf and was very happy. But I can see how the short thicker loaf would have the advantage of giving your more toppings since there’ll be more layers. No matter which way you go, this is one fantastic meatloaf packed with Italian-inspired flavors.

Make sure you seal up any seams before putting the meatloaf onto your smoker. And be careful moving the loaf to your smoker. To make things easier I transferred the assembled loaf onto a disposable grill topper while still in the kitchen. I just had to roll the loaf off of my cutting board and onto the topper. No risk of the loaf rolling off the smoker or falling apart.

For a wonderful topping after you’ve sliced the loaf, try my smoked provolone cheese sauce. Like a little kick to your meatloaf? Smoked habanero meatloaf is the thing for you.

Smoked Italian Meatloaf
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6-8 servings
 
Ingredients
For the meat mixture
  • 3 pounds ground beef
  • 1 pound ground Italian sausage
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 shallot, chopped
  • 1/2 cup Italian bread crumbs
  • Dried basil, to taste (I used about 1/2 tablespoon)
  • Dried oregano, to taste (I used about 1/2 tablespoon)
  • Ground fennel, to taste (I used 1/2 teaspoon)
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
For the stuffing
  • A few handfuls arugula, rinsed, patted dry
  • 8 slices prosciutto
  • 8 slices provolone cheese
For the glaze
  • Chili sauce
  • Italian seasoning
Instructions
  1. Fire up your smoker for 275 F. Use a lighter wood such as a fruit wood.
For the meat mixture
  1. Place all ingredients into a large bowl and mix well.
  2. Line a 9" x 13" 1" deep pan with foil. Make sure the foil extends over the sides of the pan by at least 1".
  3. Add the meat mixture to the pan and flatten it out to fill the pan, making sure the meat is the same thickness throughout. I found just using the palms of my hands to be the easiest way to do this.
For the stuffing
  1. Later the arugula, prosciutto and provolone cheese on top of the meat, leaving a 1" border around the edges.
  2. To roll up, start along the long end (or short end if you want a thicker loaf) and start to foll about 1" of the meat over onto itself. Keep going, back and forth, rolling as you go.
  3. Seal the ends and the seam. You don't want the contents to escape.
  4. Transfer to the smoker and smoke for 2 hours or until the internal temperature of the loaf measures 150 F in several places.
  5. Combine the glaze ingredients and brush over the top of the loaf.
  6. Smoke another 30 minutes.
  7. Remove and let rest for 45 minutes. If you don't let it rest long enough the cheese will ooze out when you slice it.
  8. Slice and serve.

Smoked Marinated Chuck Roast

I love smoked chuck roast. It’s something I make quite often. I usually end up chopping it for sandwiches, but I also cut it into small bites for chili. Yum. This time I decided to try something a little different by marinating the chuck roast overnight first in a wonderful marinade packed with a little sweet, a little citrus, a little soy and a hint of Worcestershire. Nothing in-your-face strong, just great flavor that penetrates the entire roast.
Now, if you do want a little heat don’t be afraid to add some hot sauce to the marinade. To get the meat truly tender you want to get to at least 200 F. And do not let any of the juices go to waste. Add them back in to the chopped or sliced meat. It’s really great stuff! If you prefer your chuck roast a little spicier, try my fiery smoked chuck roast or my smoked pepper stout beef.

Smoked Marinated Chuck Roast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8 servings
 
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 3-4 pound chuck roast, untrimmed
Instructions
  1. Combine all but roast in a bowl.
  2. Place the chuck roast into a large resealable bag or container.
  3. Add the marinade. Toss to coat, seal, and marinade overnight.
  4. Fire up your smoker for smoking at 250 F. Use a medium wood such as hickory.
  5. Remove the beef from the marinade. Shake off the excess and transfer to the smoker.
  6. Smoke until the roast reaches 145 F., about 1 hour.
  7. Transfer the beef to a large piece of foil. Seal up tightly and return to the smoker. Smoke until the temperature reaches 200F, 4-5 hours more.
  8. Remove from the smoker and let rest 15 minutes before slicing of chopping. Add any juices from the foil back into the meat for extra flavor.

Smoked Spiral Hot Dogs

What fun these smoked spiral hot dogs were to make and devour! I’ve made spiral dogs before, but this technique is much better than my old way. The key is inserting a skewer thru the dogs to keep them together after slicing. And of course, the skewer keeps you from slicing in too far. I smoked my spiral dogs, but you could just as easily grill them.
Anita and I recently ran across The Mustard Man at an event at the Jungle Jim’s market in Fairfield, OH. After sampling each of mustard I instantly picked up a bottle of each one. They are truly fantastic. I squeezed a bit of the Simple Pepper and Simply Maple on each of our spiral dogs. The mustard runs down into the spirals, filling each bite with mustardy goodness. We cannot recommend The Mustard Man’s mustard enough!

Love hot dogs as much as I do? Check out my free eCookbook that is packed with tons of hot dog recipes.

Smoked Spiral Hot Dogs
Author: 
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Ingredients
  • Large hot dogs
  • Wooden or bamboo skewers
  • Your favorite rub or seasoning (I used my Fire-Eater seasoning)
Instructions
  1. Fire up your smoker for 225 F. You can also make these hot dogs on a grill
  2. Carefully guide the skewer through the center of the hot dogs. If you get the skewer crooked at it pokes out of the side of the dog just pull it back and try again. I found that laying the hot dogs down on a flat surface and sliding the skewer in from the side, parallel to the counter top, worked best.
  3. Lay the skewered dog down onto a cutting board or flat surface.
  4. Holding a knife at a 45 degree angle, starting at one end of the dog, cut into the dog down to the skewer. Start rolling the hot dog, keeping the knife inserted into the hot dog, making cuts that are about 1/2" apart. Continue rolling and cutting until you reach the other end of the hot dog.
  5. Gently pull the dog apart, separating the cuts. Be careful, you don't want to break it.
  6. Sprinkle with your favorite seasoning.
  7. Place dogs onto the smoker and smoke for 2 hours. If grilling grill until done as desired.
  8. Serve hot.


Smoked Beets with Balsamic Glaze

Wow. I love beets, but I really wasn’t expecting these smoked beets with balsamic glaze to be so amazing. The perfect combination of flavors, starting with just a hint of smoke and ending with goat cheese drizzled with a fantastic balsamic glaze. The more I cook, the more I find myself using balsamic vinegar in my dishes, and it certainly was a star in this one.
If you don’t have a smoker you can still make these beets. Just toss them in a 375 F oven and roast them until tender. They won’t have that light smoky flavor, but they will still be great with the glaze and cheese.

In a pinch you can skip using fresh beets. Grab canned or jarred, slice and serve with the remaining ingredients. Or just make my non-smoked beet but-still-really-great beet salad.

Smoked Beets with Balsamic Glaze
Recipe type: Side
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4-6 servings
 
Ingredients
For the beats
  • 4 large beets
  • Your favorite herb goat cheese
  • Balsamic glaze, from below
For balsamic glaze
  • 1 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon Kosher Salt
Instructions
For the beats
  1. Fire up your smoker for smoking at 250 F.
  2. Meanwhile, boil or steam the beats until just tender. Let cool completely then peel.
  3. Transfer beets to the smoker and smoke for 30 minutes-1 hour. You just want a hint of smoke flavor.
  4. Remove from the smoker and let cool then slice thin.
  5. Serve with the cheese drizzled with the balsamic glaze.
For balsamic glaze
  1. Add all ingredients to a small saucepan.
  2. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer and continue to simmer, stirring often, until thick. The glaze should coat the back of spoon.
  3. Remove from heat and cover until ready to use.

Barbacoa-Style Smoked Chuck Roast

It’s an understatement to say I’m a big fan of smoking chuck roast. When it’s on sale it’s big time cheaper than brisket and yet still tender, moist and ‘beefy’. Sometimes I slice my smoked chuck roast, but more times than not I chop it for sandwiches or cut it into chunks for use in a chili or stew. This barbacoa-style smoked chuck roast packs fantastic flavor and juiciness, with a nice hint of heat. Perfect on a chopped beef sandwich!
I do not trim my chuck roasts before marinating them. I want all that fat to still be on the meat when I smoke it, adding flavor and moisture. After the meat is done I slice or chop it, leaving off the fatty pieces.

Barbacoa-Style Smoked Chuck Roast
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8 servings
 
Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 teaspoons cumin
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3/4 cup chicken broth
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 3-4 chipotle chiles in adobo
  • 3-4 pound chuck roast, untrimmed
Instructions
  1. Combine all but roast in a bowl.
  2. Place the chuck roast into a large resealable bag or container.
  3. Add the marinade. Toss to coat, seal, and marinade overnight.
  4. Fire up your smoker for smoking at 250 F. Use a medium wood such as hickory.
  5. Remove the beef from the marinade. Shake off the excess and transfer to the smoker.
  6. Smoke until the roast reaches 145 F., about 1 hour.
  7. Transfer the beef to a large piece of foil. Seal up tightly and return to the smoker. Smoke until the temperature reaches 200F, 4-5 hours more.
  8. Remove from the smoker and let rest 15 minutes before slicing of chopping. Add any juices from the foil back into the meat for extra flavor.

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Fried Smoked Wings

Wonderfully smoky, tender meat with a lightly crispy skin, these smoked and then fried chicken wings were a thing of beauty. These are one of most dangerous things you could ever put in front of me. I don’t even need any sauce to toss or dunk them in, either. Just give me a big basket of them and get out of the way!
The process is simple. Season your wings, and place them onto your smoker. No messing around with them either. Just smoke for 2 hours.

When the wings are done you toss them into a deep fryer for a minute or so, until golden brown and lightly crispy. You can also make a big huge batch and freeze the smoked wings (before frying). All you have to do is thaw them and deep fry them when you’re ready to serve them at a later time. I was worried that making them from the frozen smoked wings would result in over-cooked, tough wings, but oh no, they were fantastic!

There’s a brewpub by our house, Redemption Alewerks, that makes crazy-good chicken wings. They smoke them first over a mix of mesquite and cherry woods, then flash fry them. They sauce them then place them over a hot flame to finish them off. My approach is similar, but I don’t always put them onto the grill at the end. They are fantastic either way, but grilling them real quick does help set the sauce.

For smoked wings that seem like they were fried, but weren’t, try my almost-fried smoked wings. Same great crunch and flavor without the oil.

I absolutely love chicken wings, cooked any way, with any sauce (or without). I love them so much that I created a free eCookbook that is full of my favorite wing recipes.

Fried Smoked Wings
Author: 
Recipe type: Appetizer
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6-8 servings
 
Ingredients
  • 3-4 pounds chicken wings, flats and drumettes separated, tips discarded or saved for making chicken broth
  • Your favorite rub (I used Albukirky Seasoning's Green Chile Rub)
  • Canola oil, for frying
Instructions
  1. Fire up your smoker for 225 F. Use any wood you like. I used Jack Daniel's whiskey barrel chunks because I wanted a good, noticeable smoke flavor. Use a lighter wood if you want your wings to be a little less smoky.
  2. Place the wings onto the smoker and smoke for 2 hours. No need to rotate or flip them.
  3. When done, remove from the smoker. You can deep fry them immediately or freeze them for thawing and frying later.
  4. To fry, heat canola oil to 350 F.
  5. Working in batches, add the wings and fry for 1-2 minutes or until they are the desired color.
  6. Let cool slightly. Serve tossed with your favorite sauce and your favorite dipping sauce on the side.
  7. Optional: Toss the wings onto a hot grill for 1 minute after saucing them to set the sauce.